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Vocelle & Berg is open and ready to assist you with your legal needs during the pandemic. Although working mostly remotely, we are operating at full capacity. All of our attorneys’ emails and their paralegal / legal assistants emails are located in their individual profiles and are checked regularly. Our voicemails are also checked on a regular basis. During this time, in addition to serving your legal needs, if you have any questions regarding any COVID 19 related issues please do not hesitate to contact us. Additionally, we are reviewing clients’ commercial and business insurance policies to see if they cover business interruption during the pandemic. If you believe you are covered and have been denied by your insurance company we may be able to assist. Please practice social distancing and be safe!

If you do not have much experience as a business owner in Florida, you may not be terribly clear on what qualifies as a breach of contract. Going one step further, you may not even know when you can take legal action for what you perceive as a breach of contract.

AllBusiness.com clarifies when parties can sue for breach of contract. Protect your rights and your business with reliable insight.

Defining a breach of contract

At its core, a breach of contract occurs when someone fails to fulfill contractual obligations. Examples include when a person declares his or her refusal to carry out contract terms, does not complete contract terms in an agreed-upon manner or makes it so that others cannot complete their contractual obligations.

Making legal action valid

Certain conditions create a valid stance for filing a breach of contract suit. Usually, contracts are only enforceable when in writing. While a person may go back on her or his word or the terms of a verbal agreement, expect to have an uphill battle bringing a breach of contract suit if nothing was in writing. Even with a written contract signed by all parties, you can only take legal action if you do so within the statute of limitations. The court in which you file a suit, case conditions and the case category all impact the time frame for taking legal action.

Taking your case to court

You have the option of taking your suit to federal or state court, but also the option of going to either small claims or civil trial court. Less expensive and simple suits go to small claims court, while more complex and financially substantial cases go to civil trial court.

This information is only intended to educate and should not be interpreted as legal advice.

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